Turquoise Ixia Care: Growing Turquoise Ixia Viridiflora Plants


By: Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

Also known as green ixia or green flowered corn lily, turquoise ixia (Ixis viridflora) is bound to be one of the most unique plants in the garden. Ixia plants consist of grassy foliage and tall spikes of 12 to 24 flowers that make a grand appearance in spring. Each turquoise ixia bloom displays bright aquamarine petals with a contrasting “eye” of intense purple-black.

Growing turquoise ixia isn’t difficult, and turquoise ixia care isn’t complicated. Turquoise ixia plants, which grow from small bulbs, require well-drained soil and full sunlight. Read on for more information, and learn how to grow Ixia viridiflora plants.

How to Grow Ixia Viridiflora

Plant turquoise ixia bulbs 2 inches deep in early autumn if you live where winters remain above 20 degrees F. (-7 C.). Plant bulbs about inch deeper and cover them with a thick layer of mulch if you live where winter temperatures drop to 10 degrees F. (-12 C.). In this climate, late fall is the best time for planting.

Plant turquoise ixia bulbs in spring if you live in a colder climate. You’ll see blooms in early summer. Dig the plants and store them in paper sacks during the winter.

Alternatively, grow plant turquoise ixia bulbs in small containers measuring about 6 inches in diameter. Fill the containers with a well-drained potting medium, such as one part potting mix and two parts coarse sand. Allow about 1 to 1 ½ inches between bulbs, with the same distance between the bulbs and the edge of the pot. Bring the pots indoors before temperatures drop below about 28 degrees F. (-2 C.).

You can also grow turquoise ixia plants as annuals, and plant new bulbs every spring.

Turquoise Ixia Care

Water turquoise ixia bulbs immediately after planting. Thereafter, soak the soil about once every 10 days beginning when you notice visible growth. Allow the soil to dry after the foliage dies down and turns yellow after blooming, then keep the soil dry until spring to prevent the bulbs from rotting. If the area is irrigated or you live in a rainy climate, dig the bulbs and store them in a dry location until spring.

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Ixia Viridiflora Jade Green

Turquoise blue with a twinkling black eye, this ever sought after beauty becomes ever more rare. The small crop we have has been specially grown for us. Brilliant as a cut flower and No 1 in Holland. We've been fortunate in obtaining seed of this most spectacular plant which is one of the most expensive florist flowers. Ideal for cutting and showing and possibly best grown in an 8" pot during the summer plunged beneath bark or similar material and then brought indoors during the winter. Desirable and almost hardy. 18"-2'.

How to Grow Ixia from Seed

One of nature’s most beautiful rare green flowers, Ixia viridiflora is easy to grow from seed. Sow it in deep pots or trays in spring and keep them in a cold frame or greenhouse. Ixia will germinate very quickly and you should have flowering plants the following year.

Seed can be sown in pots all year round under glass. Germination typically takes 20 to 30 days at 75F

Allow the grass-like seedlings to grow on to the following Spring and separate them when they become obviously overcrowded. The bulbs are very small so don't overlook them when potting on in successive years.

A mixture of 40% potting compost, 50% horticultural grit and 10% coarse sand works well. This may seem overly gritty but the bulb needs good drainage and may rot in a richer mix. Water sparingly when the shoots appear. After flowering allow the foliage die down then keep the pot warm and dry. Don't water it again until the following year.

On very light sandy soil Ixia may be grown outside without too much trouble but as a half-hardy bulb most British gardeners will get better results using containers which can be moved inside over the winter.


Are Ixia Flowers perennials?

Planting

  1. Dig your holes 5cm(2in) deep and about the same apart. If growing in a container plant 5 corms to 12.cm(5in).
  2. If the sides of the holes are compacted, break the soil up with a fork.
  3. If planting in a container use J. Arthur Bower's John Innes No. 2 mixed 50%/50% with Multi-Purpose Compost and added sharp sand.

Furthermore, how do you grow Ixia from seed? Ixia viridiflora is easy to grow from seed. Sow it in deep pots or trays in spring and keep them in a cold frame or greenhouse. It will germinate very quickly and you should have flowering plants the following year. Ixia viridiflora is best appreciated in splendid isolation.

Also know, do alliums come back every year?

Alliums aren't too picky: In most cases, alliums grow in average garden soil and need full sun and good drainage. The drainage is critical because so many of the bulbs are huge and will rot with too much moisture. Aside from that, they are easy to grow and come back year after year with almost no maintenance.

What do you do with freesia bulbs after flowering?

Move your potted plant to a cool, dark location. You may keep the freesia in a dark location until you're ready to start blooms again, even if you change seasons. If you remove the plant from dormancy in winter, you'll enjoy blooms during the summer. If you remove them in the fall, you'll enjoy blooms in the spring.


Ixia Planting Guide

Ixia Bulbs are perfect for New Zealand’s hot climates, but can be grown in most areas if planted under roof overhangs to restrict water, while still allowing the full sun conditions.

Ixia, along with a vast range of other Spring flowering Bulbs are Native to South Africa.

Ixia’s grow from small corms, much like those of crocuses, sometimes with slightly raised centers.

Ixias are best planted in groups, in borders, or containers for the greatest visual impact - they make fantastic cut flowers.

Ixia’s should be planted in sheltered areas of the garden to avoid the flowers toppling over.

  • Ixia’s do well in pot’s or straight into the garden. They require somewhere hot and dry. full sun, and free draining soils. Potting mix will work perfectly if you wish to pot them up, just remembering that potting mix dries out quickly, so an occasional watering is needed.
  • Once you’ve found a nice sunny spot in the garden (preferably protected from too much wind), loosen the soil to a depth of at least 15cm. Mix in some of our Bulb Food, or a general purpose fertilizer.
  • Plant your Ixia Bulbs (corms) with the pointy side facing up, to a depth of 4-5cm.
  • Water initially to get them started, and keep the soil mildy moist throughout their growth period. Avoid over watering. Usually, if they’re in the ground, they won’t need a lot of watering, as our Winter will take care of that for you.

Ixia’s make for a stunningly beautiful cut flower - if you’re wanting to bring them inside for all to admire, you should cut the stems in the morning, ensuring there’s at least 10cm left on the plant.

Cutting flowers in the early mornings will generally prolong their vaselife.

After flowering, it’s important to let your Ixia plants die down completely. Let the leaves go brown and dry before you remove them, as this is important for the growth of the corm.

You can leave the corms in the ground for next season, or if you wish to lift the corms, the best time to be doing so is late December/early January.


Turquoise Ixia Bulbs - How To Grow Ixia Viridiflora Plants In The Garden - garden

Rare and exotic plants & seeds

The dazzling Turquoise Ixia (Ixia viridiflora) has one of the rarest and most beautiful colors in the plant world. Each spring, this Freesia relative sends up striking, 1.5 to 2 foot tall flower spikes that demand attention! Each stem has 12 to 24 blooms of shimmering aquamarine or sea-green. The satiny purple centers and yellow anthers contrast beautifully with the petals. Unfortunately, this lovely plant is endangered in its homeland of South Africa. Adult bulbs are rarely seen for sale.

The Turquoise Ixia comes from the Cape region of South Africa, where it grows during the winter and goes dormant for the summer. Each year, the bulb-like corm produces several baby corms, which may be separated. The flowers appear around April or May in the Northern hemisphere. The petals close up at night and open in sunlight, repeating this for several days. In the wild, the unusual flower color attracts beetle species, which pollinate the blooms. A paler form of this Ixia exists, which is not as attractive as this form in my opinion. The Turquoise Ixia is unfortunately declining in the wild due to over-harvesting and habitat destruction.

It is relatively easy to grow, provided that its basic needs are met. It does best in temperatures between 40 and 80 degrees F (4-27 degrees C) during its growing season of October to May (April to November in the Southern hemisphere). Warmer temperatures might be tolerated if nights are cool. During the summer dormancy, the corms must be kept dry to avoid rotting. The plants should receive mostly-sunny conditions during the winter growing period, and must be protected from frost. They grow well in a small pot in quick-draining soil, such as a mix of 2 parts coarse sand and 1 part potting soil. In the right conditions, this is an easy and very exciting plant to grow.

Unfortunately, fake seeds of it have emerged from China. I guarantee that my seeds and bulbs are genuine.


Ixia viridiflora is unlike anything else you can grow - long arching spikes of exquisite jade green or turquoise flowers carried on thin wiry stems which move in the lightest breeze but which will withstand any normal weather without damage. It is easy to grow Ixia viridiflora from seed, with flowers being produced after only 8 months. These are very attractive, but do not reveal the full potential of the species. In subsequent years the corms will produce more robust plants and larger flower spikes which can reach 2′ to 3′ in height.

Ixia viridiflora is unlike anything else you can grow - long arching spikes of exquisite jade green or turquoise flowers carried on thin wiry stems which move in the lightest breeze but which will withstand any normal weather without damage. It is easy to grow Ixia viridiflora from seed, with flowers being produced after only 8 months. These are very attractive, but do not reveal the full potential of the species. In subsequent years the corms will produce more robust plants and larger flower spikes which can reach 2′ to 3′ in height.


How do I grow Ixia Bulbs UK?

Read full answer here. Furthermore, when should I plant Ixia bulbs?

Ixia bulbs are winter growers and should be planted in early fall and watered to start them into growth. In mild areas they may be grown outside in a sunny positions but in cold winter areas they need frost protection.

Additionally, how do you plant bulbs UK? Planting in borders This method applies to spring-, summer- and autumn-flowering bulbs: Dig a hole wide and deep enough for your bulbs. Plant most bulbs at two to three times their depth. For example, for a bulb measuring 5cm (2in) high, dig a hole 10-15cm (4-6in) deep and sit the bulb in the bottom of it.

Moreover, how tall do Ixia get?

Find Your Planting Zone:

SKU AM005221
Mature Height 12-16" tall
Bulb Spacing 15 bulbs per sq. ft.
Bulb Size 5 cm
Planting Depth Plant 2-5" deep

When should you plant bulbs UK?

When to plant If you want to fill your garden with colour next spring, plant bulbs from October to December, before the first frost. Daffodils, tulips, crocus, grape hyacinths and fritillarias are just some of the plants to choose from.


Ixia Mixed

This product is currently out of stock and unavailable.

Ixias are big on colour. Their bright petals come in candy shades of white, orange, red, purple and yellow and a mix of them all. The blooms have a dark centre, which makes the colours seem even brighter.

Each Ixia flower is around 5-7cm across and will bloom in succession for an impressive period from late spring to summer. They make excellent cut flowers and can last up to two weeks in a vase.

Try planting Ixia at the front of a bed, as part of a lawn planting or in a container. Like most spring flowering bulbs, Ixia look best when planted in clumps, so if you are putting them in the garden/lawn, put three or five in each hole for the best display.

In pots place them closely.
Ixias are easy, you can simply plant, relax and enjoy as they come back year and year without any fuss. They have narrow, grass like foliage.

Our Tip: In meadow plantings you will have to allow time for the foliage to die down before you mow. To allow for this you could mow a border and or a path to make their senescence less unseemly and more part of the grand scheme.

Ixia originate in the sandy soils of the mountainous grasslands of South Africa. Here, they grow well in sunny, well drained positions of similar climates. Plant the corm 10-15cm with the pointy end up. Water to establish, then only if rainfall is low. Ixia bulbs are best left in the soil to naturalise and you will only need to dig and divide them after around four or five years. We recommend adding a little general purpose fertiliser as they begin to bloom. Apart from that just relax and enjoy the show!

Ixia are in the same family as Iris and just as simple to grow. Known variously as Ixias, African Corn Lilies, or Wand Flowers.


Watch the video: How to grow Sparaxis bulbs with full update YASH GARDENERS


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