Pseudolithos


Pseudolithos is a genus of succulent, flowering plants of the family Apocynaceae, native to Somalia, Yeman and Oman. The name "Pseudo-lithos" means "false-stone" and refers to their pebble-like appearance.

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Philodendron 'Pink Princess'

White and yellow variations happen naturally in plants. Pink variegation, however, isn't as common. The 'Pink Princess' is a Philodendron erubescens, a common enough tropical plants found in many nurseries. The 'Pink Princess' cultivar is a man-made hybrid developed in the 1970s. It's been around for a while, lurking in nurseries like any other Philodendron erubescens.

Thanks to Plantfluencers, 'Pink Princess' is now one of the most famous rare specimens houseplants lovers are willing to take out a personal loan to purchase. Is it worth it? Cuttings for Philodendron 'Pink Princess' can be close to $100 and whole plants can cost several hundred dollars, depending on the size. Courtney Warwick of Blkgirlgrnthumb says, "I get happy whenever I see pictures of them. I'm not going to lie, if I had the means to drop major cash to get them, I absolutely would!"


Pseudolithos Whitesloanea crassa

My first Ascleps P. migiurtinis and Whitesloanea crassa. Hopefully they will be ready to flower in the next year. I was surprised how small they were at first. I recommend them to anyone's collection. Don't seem to be too hard to take care of yet and I'm in Illinois. I'm going to transfer them to a semi-hydroponic setup when it gets warmer and I will share those pictures on this thread when I do. I'm hoping to add P. cubiformis soon and P. caput-viperae, however, I can only seem to find sources for that one in Germany and its rather expensive! If anyone knows someone in the states that sells P. caput-viperae please let me know, thanks -Tom

This message was edited Feb 23, 2011 5:25 PM

I would check with Gene Joseph of Living Stones Nursery (http://www.lithops.net/) and Guy Wrinkle of Rare Exotics (http://www.rareexotics.com/store/). Neither has the Pseudolithos you want, but they have sold others in the past and might know how/where you could acquire the one you want.

Thanks faeden for sharing that information, I will check it out

You're welcome. Hopefully others will have suggestions too.

I have had this pseudolithos in s/h for about a year. Have grown them before and they really like this culture. They bloom for me every year and I have even had seeds from them.

wow that's a cool picture sally thanks for sharing, did you grow that pseudolithos from seed in s/h too?

Hi TK,
Did you get your plants locally or order them? I am in the west burbs and I have yet to come across pseudoliths in any of the greenhouses/nurseries around here.

Hey plexipuss you right there aren't any pseudolithos selling around here that I'm aware of. There might be in a plant show for the "cactus and succulent society of greater chicago" in June or something but I doubt it. they have a website too. I got my pseudolithos on ebay, every now and then there are sellers from California so check that out. Also I got my whitesloanea crassa from out-of-africa-plants.com. the best nursery around our area i think is ShoalCreekSucculents.com they're in Elgin in the suburbs, i know the owner owns her own pseudolithos but doesnt have any for sale, maybe in the next years though. I havn't had any problems with ordering them either they all made it though the mail fine

I did not grow the seed in s/h. I start with dirt and switch when the seedlings are big enough. I bought them online. They are not sold locally here either as far as I know.

Here's the website for the Cactus and Succulent Society of Greater Chicago: http://www.cssgc.org/ Their annual show and sale is the end of July, but they'll also have a booth at the Chicago Garden & Flower Show (http://www.chicagoflower.com/) the first part of March. If it's anything like ours, it's an amazing event to attend.

I saw some pictures of the shows in SF and LA they looked really cool, never been to one before. I might make a trip out to LA or san diego this summer to check their show out and do other things.

Yes, our C&S shows/sales are really great. The one not to miss is the Los Angeles Intercity Show, which is usually held the 3rd weekend in August. This year it's August 20-21 (http://www.sgvcss.com/). The CSSA also has a show and sale around 4th of July (see calendar of events in above link).

But what I was referring to as "ours" was our regional garden and flower show, which is also held in March (http://www.sfgardenshow.com/).

I went to the CSSGC show last year, it is small, nothing like the West Coast shows I have seen pictures of. They didn't have pseudoliths or anything really rare but I got a few nice plants there.

TK- Have you been to Ted's Greenhouse in Tinley Park? They have a really good selection of harder to find plants. I found several stapeliads last time I was there.

I never heard of Ted's I will definitely check that out soon, a good source for stapeliads i think too is miles2go.com he just updated his inventory, shoalcreeksucculents had a ton of stapeliads but they aren't available till 2012 because she is transferring them all to s/h setup, thanks for that info plex

This message was edited Feb 24, 2011 6:11 PM

I plan on attending the C&S show in St. Louis, MO. this year in July http://www.hscactus.org/SHOW/show-2.html I hear it is worth the trip.
Gary

Thanks Gary, I google mapped it and 5:30 hours isn't bad. I've driven to carbindale a 6 hr drive easily a couple times. I'll definitely consider that trip

It's a 5-6 hour trip for me to go to the L.A. Intercity Show/Sale, and I find it very worthwhile.

I bought mine on ebay from teedee. Her prices are pretty good. She has some neat stuff.


Watch the video: Hungry Venus flytraps snap shut on a host of unfortunate flies. Life - BBC


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